Football, brought to you by…. The Library of Congress?

Brownsville High School? football team Runyon, Robert, 1881-1968 The South Texas Border

Brownsville High School? football team
Runyon, Robert, 1881-1968
The South Texas Border

It’s hard, living here in Bronco nation, to ignore the fact that the Broncos are headed to the Superbowl in the next week. To honor that, and the fact that some of your students are possibly more excited by this than history right now, I bring to you some Library of Congress football sources to share with your students. You can use these images and primary sources to get a historical context of the game.

In the History of the American West, 1860-1920: Photographs from the Collection of the Denver Public Library you will find a variety of photos from both highschool and college football teams.

I mean, who knew how involved the Colorado School of Mine’s mascot was in the game?

A Colorado School of Mines football player in a four point stance uses the mascot burro as a blocking dumbie at Brooks Field, in Jefferson County.

A Colorado School of Mines football player in a four point stance uses the mascot burro as a blocking dumbie at Brooks Field, in Jefferson County

Oh and don’t leave out your cheerleaders either : http://cdm15330.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p15330coll22/id/18371

Five University of Wyoming cheerleaders wear matching cowboy hats and sweaters with wool skirts at a football game.

Five University of Wyoming cheerleaders wear matching cowboy hats and sweaters with wool skirts at a football game.

Some Gunnison women were in on the action as well. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2013646392/

Here is a 1920 photo showing the Craig and Meeker football and girl basketball teams. Craig High School football team, Craig High School basketball team, Meeker High School basketball team, Meeker High School football team.

And of course, thanks to Thomas Edison we can watch a 1903 Yale/Princeton game in action. http://www.loc.gov/item/00563607

The Collection called The South Texas Border, 1900-1920 contains many football photos, including some action shots.

How about a discussion on the tie between advertising and sports? http://www.loc.gov/item/cola000048

Or how about an ethnographic look at how football fits into college campus tradition with a webcast titled Campus Traditions: Folklore from the Old-Time College to the Modern Mega-University

So, as your students generate excitement over this great Bronco season, don’t forget to use some primary sources for perspective. Whatever your historic football needs, the Library has got you covered.

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